Recent Fire Damage Posts

Fire Safety - Campfires

8/8/2019 (Permalink)

Here at SERVPRO of North Prince William County we pride ourselves on being a leader in fire and water damage restoration.  Our highly trained specialists are trustworthy and “faster to any size disaster.” Our “restore first” mentality helps keep the costs down and get you back into your home or business faster.

When the panic of a disaster hits you will be glad you thought ahead...put SERVPRO of North Prince William County in your phone NOW.  If disaster strikes we are here for you 24/7/365! Call SERVPRO of North Prince William County (703) 368-4399

Having said that...let’s discuss outdoor fire safety.

It’s the end of Summer.  School is starting. The temps are high and the ground and brush are most likely dry.  You have a lot on your mind while trying to soak up the last days of summer camping and outdoor fun.

My name is Anne Marie and today I’d like to share the rules of building a campfire.

First things first, make sure ahead of time that you are allowed to have a campfire where you are located.  (That would certainly put a damper on things.)

Next, check that there are no burn bans in place.  If there aren’t then observe the area for windy conditions.  Very important so things don’t get out of hand.

You are now ready to dig your pit.  Select a spot without any overhanging branches.  

Now that you have your pit, circle it with rocks and rake a 10 foot area around the pit.  Once completed there should be just dirt in this area, nothing that could catch fire should be left on this ground.

If you have extra firewood/kindling stack it upwind and away from the fire.  Don’t leave anything around that could be a tripping hazard.

Never leave a campfire unattended by an adult.

Keep a hose or a bucket of water close by at all times.  You should always have a metal shovel as well.

When you are ready to call it a night or leave the fire be sure it is extinguished.  This means douse it with water, stir it up with a shovel and dump more water on it. The fire should be cold beyond a shadow of a doubt before you leave.

Please also remember:  Only burn wood.

The above rules are not just for camping they are for the fire pit in your backyard as well.  When things are easy and convenient we sometimes become more lax with adhering to these rules.

This is a personal experience of mine.  I was visiting a friend that had a fire pit in their yard.  It was around 10 AM when I knelt down to pick something up in the area of their fire pit.  The ground was quite warm. I alerted my friend to the situation. They had used the fire pit the night before.  Upon stirring the ashes we saw that down below there were still red coals. There was a plant/weed that had very long roots that connected from plant to plant that grew in the area.  These roots had “caught fire” so to speak, there wasn’t enough oxygen for them to ignite but they were red at the pit and carried the heat just below the surface of the ground. If this had reached the woods or an uncleared area this story could’ve ended very differently.  What did they do wrong? The fire had been left cold enough instead of completely cold. So, while no one in my story needed to call SERVPRO, make sure you are prepared in case someone in your story does.

Add SERVPRO of North Prince William County (703) 368-4399 to your contacts today!

Fire Extinguisher Tips

7/5/2016 (Permalink)

Fire tipes from SERVPRO

Fire extinguisher tips 

Only use a fire extinguisher if.....

*The fire is contained to a small area, such as a wastebasket, and is not growing.

*Everyone has exited the building

*The fire department has been called or is being called; and the room is not filled with smoke.